SPICE IT UP

YOUR 101 GUIDE TO USING TRADITIONAL MEXICAN SPICES
YOUR 101 GUIDE TO USING TRADITIONAL MEXICAN SPICES

CORIANDER

Made from the seeds of the cilantro plant, coriander is very common in Mexican, Spanish and Tex-Mex cooking. Spicy, citrus-like and nutty, the seasoning is used to warm up and flavor chili, roasted meats and vegetables as an addition on its own or as part of a spice rub.

ONION POWDER

A commonly used seasoning often found in spice blends and seasoned salts, use onion powder on meats prior to cooking and sear in its sharp and savory notes. Created by dehydrating or drying onion, it's a real timesaver when you want to quickly add a hint of onion flavor to food.

PAPRIKA

Paprika can be found in hot or sweet varieties, and is also used as a coloring for rice and soups. This smoky seasoning is often a component found in chili powders, a Tex-Mex and Latin American cuisine staple. The addition of chili powders will give food a bold flavor and a warm (but not scorching) heat.

DRIED GARLIC

A relative of the onion, garlic is a popular flavoring for adding some zest to any savory meal. Use it crushed, minced, dried, fresh, roasted or even as infused oil — garlic is a pungent and spicy addition to both meats and vegetables.

GROUND CUMIN

Slightly bitter but packing a punch of heat and flavor, cumin seeds are actually the dried fruit of a flowering plant. Often found in chili blends and adobos, cumin is a great spice for flavoring legumes, white meats, sausages and soups. Whole cumin can also be found in some cheeses and breads

DRIED OREGANO

Warm and aromatic, oregano can found in Mediterranean cooking as well as South American. Mexican oregano, with notes of citrus and licorice, has an earthy flavor that can be used to highlight dishes that use tomatoes and grilled or sautéed vegetables.

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